Best Beginner Motorcycles

Best Beginner Motorcycles

You’ve recently completed your motorcycle safety course and are eager to get out on the road. You’ve picked the equipment that most appealed to you. ATGATT demands, among other things, a new helmet, gloves, and a beautiful jacket. The only place you’re trapped is on the first motorcycle. How to find best beginner motorcycles ? Which one do you think you should get? What type should you consider? Which is the safest option? There are a lot of options out there, so here are a few simple questions to think about before you buy a motorcycle.

What is the Motorcycle’s Purpose?

Before you consider the brand, color options, or anything else, decide on the goal of your first motorcycle. Is it designed to be used for commuting? Do you enjoy riding after work or on weekends? Is it possible to combine on-road and off-road riding? Which ones you should think about and which ones you should avoid is determined by how you use your motorbike.

What Kind of Power Do You Need?Best Beginner Motorcycles

You’ll need to cut down your alternatives even further after you’ve decided on a sort. Most manufacturers provide a variety of sizes for each type of motorcycle. While you’re beginning to ride, you’ll want a motorcycle that can meet your needs without being too powerful to handle. As a novice, you don’t want anything that’s too huge, too tall, or has more power than you can handle, but you do want something that matches your size.

How Much Money Are You Willing to Spend on a Motorcycle?

Another factor to consider is how much you want to spend on your first motorcycle. Is it conceivable to purchase a gently used motorcycle that you can ride for a year or two before upgrading to something larger or more in line with your long-term objectives? If there isn’t a strong used motorcycle market where you live, should you buy a lower-cost new motorcycle or go directly to your long-term vision of what you want? You will very probably drop your motorcycle, fall over softly, or be involved in an accident. How much can you afford to fix in bodywork or components, even if you have good insurance with a deductible?

What Should You Look for in an Entry-Level Motorcycle?

There are several factors to consider before buying a motorcycle, but we’ve narrowed it down to a handful that will assist you in choosing the finest beginner motorcycle. These are some basic traits to look for in a motorcycle to help you in your hunt for your next adventure.

  • 600cc or Less Engine Capacity

A 600cc engine is a fantastic place to start for inexperienced riders. A 600cc cruiser may have half the horsepower of a 600cc sportbike, thus the rider must determine where they feel most at peace with the motorcycle they desire. Second, a 600cc motorcycle may be too small for a larger rider, while a smaller rider may find a 600cc motorcycle too huge. Again, it’s a starting point for consideration, but you, as the rider, must decide what fits and works best for you.

  • The Anti-lock Braking Device (ABS) is a braking system that prevents the vehicle from locking up (ABS)

Most motorcycles have a traditional braking system that does not rely on a computer to keep the brakes from locking up when they are applied too hard. Anti-lock brakes are standard on certain automobiles, but most will need you to purchase them as an add-on option. ABS is important because it keeps the tires and brakes from locking up and skidding when the brakes are applied too hard. As a novice rider, you’ll be more worried with over-using the brakes than with not applying them enough in a panic stop situation.

  • Windscreen / Fairing

You may tuck beneath the windscreen or fairing on the front of your motorcycle to stay out of the wind and weather. On a longer ride, having to lean forward to combat the wind’s force exhausts you. Because increased wind force equals increased speed, a highway ride without a windshield may produce greater fatigue than a trip with a windshield. A windscreen, like a car’s windshield, keeps small items and pests out while you’re riding. In general, biking with it keeps you cleaner and more energized than riding without it.

  • Seat Back Height

As a new rider, one thing to keep in mind is seat height and how it impacts your inseam. The seat height must changed to accommodate the length of your legs when you need to stop and put one or both feet down. If the seat height is too high, you may have to lean the motorcycle over just to put your foot down, or you may have to stand on your tiptoes to keep the motorcycle upright and steady. On the other side, a shorter motorcycle with a longer inseam may be uncomfortable since it’s nearly too easy to touch the ground.

  • The Handlebar’s Height

Rider posture, like seat height, is influenced by handlebar height, which influences fatigue and comfort when riding. You must be able to reach the hand controls easily when seated on the motorcycle. You shouldn’t have to stretch to reach the controls, and you shouldn’t have to lean too much to access them. Your elbows should slightly bent as you seat on the motorcycle and reach for the controls to keep you comfortable and attentive when riding.

With all of these considerations, selecting whether to purchase new or used is always a challenge. Whether you’re looking for the greatest cruiser motorcycle or the best sport motorcycle for beginners, we’ve got you covered. Below is a list of the 14 best bikes for beginners.

5 Best Beginner Motorcycles

  1. Honda Monkey
    Motorcycle Type: Standard (Mini)
    Displacement: 125cc
    Engine: Fuel-injected single cylinder
    Transmission: 4-speed
    Price: $3,999 – $4,199 (depending on trim)
Honda Monkey
Honda Monkey

The Honda Monkey was all the rage in Asia in the 1960s, and it has retained a cult following in Asia for the past 50 years. The US market will finally get its own version, which will be available in two trim levels: a basic red or yellow trim level and a more advanced trim level with ABS brakes.

Because the Monkey is a tiny, it has a low seat height and may be too small for certain bigger riders. It’s a fantastic weekend adventure trip for riders who want to see both on-road and off-road sights. It’s a nice commuter at lower speeds, but it lacks the power to keep up with heavy, high-speed traffic.

  1. KTM Corner Rocket (390 Duke)
    Motorcycle Type: Standard (Naked)
    Displacement: 373cc
    Engine: Fuel injected single-cylinder
    Transmission: 6-speed
    Price: $5,299
KTM 390 DUKE
KTM 390 DUKE

The KTM Corner Rocket is a Sport motorcycle with a bare frame and no fairing that can also be used as a Standard motorcycle. Because it’s built to withstand the harsh cornering of weekend touring and sport riding, the suspension is a touch stiffer than most. With a tiny single-cylinder engine, the power is reasonable for novices and capable of reaching highway speeds.

The Corner Rocket has a mid-range seat height that won’t sag too much under the rider’s weight thanks to the firmer suspension. It comes with a range of accessories that may purchased separately for more storage and customization.

  1. Harley-Davidson Street 500
    Motorcycle Type: Standard / Cruiser
    Displacement: 494cc
    Engine: Fuel injected v-twin (two-cylinder)
    Transmission: 6-speed
    Price: $6,899
Harley Davidson Street 500
Best Beginner Motorcycles
Harley Davidson Street 500

If you’re new to American bikes, the Harley-Davidson Street 500 is a terrific place to start. Also the seat height of the Street 500 is 25″ and the bike is low-slung. It weighs a svelte 500 pounds and is easily handled by most beginners after they have finished their initial safety instruction.

The Street 500 may used for both daily commuting and weekend tourism. With extras like a broad front fairing and saddlebags for more storage, it might make an excellent long-distance touring motorcycle. It also includes an anti-lock brake option, which we recommend getting in tandem with the security system. Motorcycle theft, particularly of Harleys, is a constant concern, so adding a layer of protection won’t hurt.

  1. Kawasaki Z125 Pro SE
    Motorcycle Type: Sport (Mini Naked)
    Displacement: 125cc
    Engine: Fuel injected one cylinder
    Transmission: 4-speed
    Price: $3,399
Kawasaki Z125 Pro SE
Best Beginner Motorcycles
Kawasaki Z125 Pro SE

The Kawasaki Z125 Pro SE I is a brand-new addition to Kawasaki‘s New Rider Endorsed lineup. The Z125 is an excellent weekend rider or daily commuter motorcycle. It’s not too heavy to ride, and the 125cc engine isn’t too strong for a novice. It doesn’t have a front fairing, so you’ll feel the wind a little more whether you’re riding on your daily commute or for fun on the weekends.

The Z125 is positioned as a new rider-friendly motorcycle. It has a 31.7-inch seat height, but it contains movable components that allow it to modified taller or shorter to comfortably accommodate almost any rider. Unfortunately, the Z125 does not include an anti-lock braking system.

  1. Harley-Davidson Superlow
    Motorcycle Type: Cruiser
    Displacement: 373cc
    Engine: Fuel injected single cylinder
    Transmission: 6-speed
    Price: $8,699
Harley-Davidson Superflow
Best Beginner Motorcycles
Harley-Davidson Superflow

The Harley-Davidson Superlow is the epitome of a low-slung cruiser motorcycle. Also, you don’t only ride a cruiser; you ride one. The Superlow comes with a full array of accessories from the H-D model lineup. It features a 25.5-inch seat height “, making it appropriate for the majority of riders. Because of the easy ergonomics, you can ride for a few hundred kilometers a day without cramping.

The Superlow has a 25.5 rating “Most riders will find the seat height to be comfortable. The footpegs and seat may changed to accommodate larger riders, and it isn’t a very heavy motorcycle. The power isn’t huge, but it’s plenty for a long drive down the highway or a quick trip to the store.

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